.

Both for reference and for fun

Related Movies:

Harvey- What does a movie about a drunk with an invisible 6'3" white rabbit for a companion have to do with ancient beliefs?  The story of this movie stems from celtic mythology and folklore.
The Secret of Roan Inish  - The legend of the selkie comes to life in this movie.
The Wicker Man - (the original) It's a mystery intertwined with ancient and modern beliefs.  The international version is not appropriate for young viewers.
The Wicker Man - (the remake) This time the mystery is set in the Pacific Northwest...
Harry Potter - ANY Harry Potter movie is filled with characters and places which are based on lore and legend.
The Black Cauldron - Not the best movie, but a decent way to introduce younger viewers to Celtic mythology when they are ready for PG movies.
The Mists of Avalon - This movie is the story of the women in the Arthurian legends, which are based on older Celtic mythologies.
The Ritual - Official description: Nessa, an archeologist at odds with the establishment and haunted by violent dreams of Celtic sacrifices tries to find an ancient relic supposedly from De Danann period(pre 500 B.C.) called the "Danu Amulet." She believes in the myth that the Tuatha De Danann were incredibly enlightened and crossed over to a spirit world.   My description: A brilliant, but psychotic, German woman tries to bring the Tuatha de Danaan back into our realm with only an archaeologist names Nessa (with a light grip on reality herself) standing in her way.  A fun "B" movie.

Related Documentaries:

Nova's Perfect Corpse - a fantastic documantary on Bog Bodies, the forensics of researching these bodies and
insights into Bronze Age culture.
Lost Treasures of the Ancient World: The Celts -  a great, updated overview on celtic society with wonderful
graphics, video and animations.
In Search of Ancient Ireland - this video explores both myths and facts.  
The Celts: Rich Traditions and Ancient Myths - this documentary from the 80's explores the Celts including their eastern european roots
King Arthur's Britain - brilliant.  You will not only learn new information, and see incredible sites, but it makes connections you will not believe that you missed while reading about the celtic world.
Irish Myths and Legends  - (2003) this video discusses lore about the leprechaun, the Irish heroes of legend as well as sacred locations.  It's really a fun film if you are into Irish legends and folk-history.
Sex and the Celts (US version)/ Land of Saints and Sinners (UK version) - not for young viewers, as if you couldn't tell from the title.  This documentary goes into, and PARTIALLY re-enacts, the sex ritual to crown the High Kings of Ireland and covers sexual mores/cultural history of Ireland from the Neolithic period through today.  Really worthwhile.
Celtic Legends/Irish Legends - mostly about the Ulster Cycle of stories, with history intertwined.

Non-fiction used in researching this site:

Cunliffe, Barry.  The Ancient Celts.  Oxford University Press, New York, 1997. This book covers the history of the Celts from their Indo-European roots through the 3rd Century AD.  
Green, Miranda.  The Gods of the Celts.  Sutton Publishing, London, 1997. The Gods of the Celts covers many
aspects of the Celtic religions (or at least what can be reconstructed): diverse pantheons, ritual customs, sacred places, cult objects.
Green, Miranda.  Celtic Goddesses.  George Braziller, 1996. Celtic Goddesses takes a look at the role of the
feminine in Celtic beliefs and rituals.  
Ross, Anne. Pagan Celtic Britain.  Academy Chicago Publishers, 1996. Focuses more on evidence than fanciful
theories on the Celtic population in Britain.
Spence, Lewis. The Magic Arts in Celtic Britain.  Newcastle Publishing, California 1996. This book, like many
others on the occult from the late 1800's through the mid 1900's have a lot of romanticism and social darwinism thrown in.  However, there are some good nuggets of information and ideas in the mix - it's a matter of seeing which is which.
Powell, T.G.E. The Celts. Thames and Hudson, London, 1994. An overview of Celtic life in ancient Europe.
Harbison, Peter.  Pre-Christian Ireland.  Thames and Hudson, London, 1995  This book covers not only pre-Christian Ireland, but also pre-Celtic!
Hellier, Chris.  Chariots of the Celts.  Archaeology, Jul/Aug 2001, Vol. 54 Issue 4, p.14
Farndon, John.  
The Celts.  Ancient History, 2003, p.45
MacSween, Ann & Mick Sharp.  
Prehistoric Scotland.  New Amsterdam, New York, 1989 This book covers not only the sites, but the folklore and legends associated with them as well.
O'Kelly, Michael J.  Early Ireland.  Cambridge University Press, New York, 1997. This book covers prehistoric
Ireland.
Stewart, Stephen.  The Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), June 25, 2003 p.11
DNA suggests the Celts held their ground; Scientists shatter Anglo-Saxon myth.
Foster, RF.  Oxford History of Ireland.  Oxford University Press, 2001
Times Atlas of World History.  Hammond World Atlas, 1993
Duffy, Sean.
 Atlas of Irish History.  Gill and Macmillan, 2000
Aalen, FHA; Kevin Whelan and Mathew Stout.
 Atlas of the Irish Rural Landscape. University of Toronto Press,
1997.
Connolly, SJ and Sean Connolly.  
Oxford Companion to Irish History. Oxford University Press, 2002.
Hellier, Chris.
 Chariots of the Celts.  Archaeology, Jul/Aug 2001, Vol. 54 Issue 4, p.14
Farndon, John.  
The Celts.  Ancient History, 2003, p.45
Wood, Juliette.  
The Celtic Book of Living and Dying.  Sterling Publishing, New York, 2004. This book's focus is
on Celtic folklore and literature.
Palmer, Geoffrey and Noel Lloyd.  A Year of Festivals.  Frederick Warne, London, 1972.  Covers festivals across
England with some history and legend intertwined.
Rhys, John. Celtic Folklore: Welsh and Manx.  University Press of the Pacific, July 2004.  During the 18th
through the early 20th century there was a renewed interest in local folklore, this is good example covering Wales and the Isle of Man
Spicer, Dorothy Gladys. Yearbook of English Festivals.  HW Wilson, New York, 1954  It covers both national and local festivals, giving the history when possible.
Spence, Lewis. The Magic Arts in Celtic Britain.  Newcastle Publishing, California 1996. This book, like many
others on the occult from the late 1800's through the mid 1900's have a lot of romanticism and social darwinism thrown in.  However, there are some good nuggets of information and ideas in the mix - it's a matter of seeing which is which.
Brennan, Martin.  The Stars and The Stones.  Thames and Hudson, New York, 1984. This book on
Astroarchaeology incorporates carvings as well as positioning of stone monuments to indicate potential uses of neolithic sites
Krupp, E.C. Skywatchers, Shamans and Kings.  John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1997. Great for an overview of
astro-archaeology    
Ryan, Michael.  Irish Archaeology Illustrated.  Rinehart Publishers, 1995. Covers Irish Archaeology from the Stone Age through the 17th century.  Lots of pictures and illustrations.
Ross, Anne. Pagan Celtic Britain.  Academy Chicago Publishers, 1996. Focuses more on evidence than fanciful
theories on the Celtic population in Britain.
Sharkey, John. Celtic Mysteries.  Thames and Hudson, New York, 1995. Celtic Mysteries uses art to discuss the beliefs of the Celts.
Sutherland, Elizabeth.  The Pictish Guide.  Birlinn Ltd, Edinburgh, 1997 This is a review of all known Pictish stones in Scotland.
Calvin, William H. How the Shaman Stole the Moon.  Bantam Books, New York, 1992. This book covers
Astroarchaeology from various sites around the globe, including Stonehenge.
Hoyle, Fred.  On Stonehenge.  W.H. Freeman and Co, San Francisco, 1977. This book's focus is on the concept of Stonehenge as an astronomical calendar.
Berry, Leigh Ann.  Druids then and now.  British Heritage, Mar 97, Vol 18 Issue 3 p.10-1
Ellis, Sian.
England's Ancient 'Special Twig'.  British Heritage, Dec 2000/Jan 2001, Vol 22, Issue 1, p.34-8
Pitts, Michael.  
Hengeworld. Pub. date July 2001, Arrow.  This book is extremely difficult to find in the US.  It
discusses the "behind the scenes" drama behind excavations of Stonehenge, Avebury and Stanton Drew while
introducing you to theories on who/what/why they were built.  Fabulous reading!
Whitelaw, Kevin. The sorcery of the stones.  US News & World Report, 07/24/2000, vol 129 Issue 4, p.34  This article counters a lot of the more "new age" types theories while offering a history and timeline of the construction of Stonehenge.
Burl, Aubrey.  Rites of the Gods. J.M. Dent and Sons, Toronto, 1981. This book attempts to reconstruct the
religious beliefs and rituals in Britain from 5000 BC thoruhg the time of the Roman invasion.

Fiction relating to topics of this site

The Fionavar Tapestry - by Guy Gavriel Kay.  A fantasy trilogy with connections to Celtic and Arthurian legends.   Wonderfully addictive!
The Dark is Rising Sequence- by Susan Cooper.  This young adult series (I am only part way through it so far) is steeped in ancient folklore and legends.  One of the titles, Silver on the Tree, even won a Newbery Medal.
The Chronicles of Prydain - by Lloyd Alexander.  Based on Welsh mythology - the movie The Black Cauldron was developed from this series.
Outlander -  by Diana Gabaldon.  It is a fun read.  A little bit of legend, a healthy amount of her lore, a bit of history, a bit of humor and quite a bit of romance.  Yum.
Druids - by Morgan Llywelyn.  A really enthralling piece of historical fiction on the Celt's side of the Gallic Wars.
Discworld Series - by Terry Pratchett.  This wonderfully funny fantasy series incorporates a lot of folklore into the storyline.

 

 

 
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